Tree Species (Scientific Name)
Aleurites moluccanus
Food
Lumber
Medicinal
Product
English Common Name
Candlenut
Indonesian Common Name
Kemiri, Miri (Javanese), Kemintan, Muncang (W. Javanese/Sudanese)
Tree Family
Euphorbiaceae
Average Leaf Size (cm)
17.5cm
Length
×
9cm
Width
Tree Height
Large (> 35m)
Elevational Range (m)
0–1200m
0 3000
Distribution
Native
Exotic
Native to Indonesia

Native to

Region
Asia, Oceania
SE Asia
Cambodia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam
Indonesia
Borneo, Java, Lesser Sunda Islands, New Guinea, Sulawesi, Sumatra

Coffee Agroforestry Information

Coffee System
Robusta
Arabica
Coffee Impact
May compete with coffee
Prevalence
Common in Coffee Agroforestry
Cultivation
Planted
Regeneration
Regenerates Naturally
Tree Management

Naturally propagated seedlings can be collected and transplanted, or it can be propagated by seed and air layering. Few input requirements once established. Fast growing and a good pioneer species to reclaim land after shifting cultivation practice. Leaves are renewed regularly and old leaves left on the soil rot and enrich the soil with organic matter and nutrients. Long lived tree.

Tree Benefits and Uses

Farmer Uses
  • Food
  • Lumber
  • Medicinal
  • Product

Fruits eaten and used to produce oil, spices, and seasoning. Oil from the fruit is an alternative source of bio-diesel, and Indonesian Bio-diesel Institute is exploring commercial uses. The seed is used as a laxative, pulped kernels are used in poultices to treat headache, fevers, ulcers, swollen joints and constipation. The bark is used to treat dysentery and the bark sap is mixed with coconut milk to treat stomach problems. Leaves are used to treat tuberculosis of the neck, headaches and gonorrhea. Oil is also used in the batik industry and cosmetics, and the oily kernels can be burnt or made into candles. The "nut" (seed) is used in a gambling game in which the objective is to break the opponent's nut by hitting it with one's own with a special cultivar in Indonesia supplying oval, thick-walled nuts for this game ('kemiri pidak', 'muncang kelenteng'). The tree is also used to make dye and its wood used to make furniture, small utensils, and matches where it is abundant.

Farm Services
  • Reforestation
  • Weed Control
Biodiversity Benefits
Yes

Birds nest in this tree